World Day of Remembrance for Traffic Victims 2018

World Day of Remembrance for Traffic Victims 2018

  • 18

  • Nov

  • days left

World Day of Remembrance for Traffic Victims 2018

Join the San Francisco Bay Area Families for Safe Streets, Walk SF, and members of the Vision Zero Coalition, as we mark San Francisco’s 4th annual:

World Day of Remembrance for Traffic Victims
Sunday, November 18

San Francisco Memorial Walk and Vigil
3:00 p.m.: Meet at 180 12th Street (between South Van Ness and Howard)
3:20 p.m.: Memorial Walk begins (see route map below)
4:30 p.m.: Press conference, steps of City Hall
Event ends at 5:00 p.m.

RSVP on Facebook or via email

Help call for change: We’re calling for faster action to reach the Vision Zero goal to end deaths and serious injuries on our streets.

Take the pledge: This year, we are also asking City leaders and members of the media to pledge to use the word “crash” not “accident” when describing collisions. This helps make clear that these tragedies are preventable, through better street design and policies that prioritize people’s safety over cars’ speed. Sign the pledge: crashnotaccident.com

Every year, more than 1.3 million people are killed and 50 million more are injured or disabled in traffic collisions — also called traffic violence. In the U.S., more than 33,000 people die from vehicle-related injuries annually. In San Francisco, on average, more than three people a day are hit by cars while walking.

The United Nations created the World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims in 2005. This global event honors the millions of people hurt and killed in crashes, and offers a chance to stand in support of their family members, friends, and loved ones. The event also calls for action, to change the idea that these tragedies are inevitable. Crashes are no “accident” — we can prevent them.

Have you been in a crash, or has a loved one been in a crash?
Learn more about Families for Safe Streets by visiting sfbafamiliesforsafestreets.org.

 

  • 18 Nov
  • 3 days left